HGTVs House Hunters Features First Throuple Family – The Daily Wire

History was made on HGTV this week when the show “House Hunters” featured its first-ever throuple in search of a home to settle down. This particular throuple consisted of a man and two women.

“In the episode titled ‘Three’s Not a Crowd in Colorado Springs,’ Brian, Lori, and Angelica (known as ‘Geli’) searched for an abode following a commitment ceremony in Aruba,” reports Deadline. “Brian and Lori married in 2002 and have two children, and are raising them with Geli’s input.”

In the episode, the husband, Brian, revealed that he always knew his wife to be bisexual and “evolved” to meet her tastes. The pair met Geli at a sports bar and the relationship unfolded “naturally.” The three moved to Colorado Springs after he landed a new job in sports marketing that allowed him to work remotely.

“I understood from day one, even when we were dating, that Lori was bisexual and interested in women and men, and so we evolved to point where we were comfortable having another woman in our lives,” he said.

“The past four years, I have been living in Lori and Brian’s house, so buying a house together as a throuple will signify our next big step as a family of five rather than all four of them plus me,” Geli said.

Needless to say, the historic episode elicited strong responses from people on social media, who were delighted to see a “modern” family represented.

“HGTV really might be the most progressive show on TV. About to watch a polyamory couple fight over a house!” tweeted USA Today’s Hemal Jhaveri.

“Wow I love to wake up and read everyone’s Twitter opinions on a polyamorous throuple featured on HGTV! Happy Valentine’s Day to me; glad you’re all such intolerant f***ing babies!” tweeted Jennifer Martin of Topix.

Other people on social media were disappointed to see HGTV promote polyamory in such a casual way.

“The normalization of polyamory rolls down the track, just as I and others predicted it would. It was, as I said, less a “slippery slope” than a simple unfolding of the logic of social liberalism,” tweeted professor Robert George.

The normalization of polyamory has become a topical subject in recent years with the advancement of same-sex marriage and gender fluidity. In 2019, the American Psychological Association even launched a task force designed to remove the “stigma” associated with it, even going so far to give the lifestyle its own politically correct term – “consensual non-monogamy.”

“Finding love and/or sexual intimacy is a central part of most people’s life experience,” the APA website says. However, the ability to engage in desired intimacy without social and medical stigmatization is not a liberty for all,” the Task Force says. “This task force seeks to address the needs of people who practice consensual non-monogamy, including their intersecting marginalized identities.”

Shortly down the list of task forces in Division 44 is the Religion and Spirituality Task Force, which promises to remove any religious objections people might have to any of the sexual lifestyles listed.

“The Task Force on Religion and Spirituality was created to encourage a confluence between sexual minority orientations and identities and religious experiences,” the page says. “It further attempts to create affirmation and acceptance for LGBT individuals of faith within theologically diverse ideological traditions. Given the importance of faith and even religious tradition in the lives of many LGBT individuals, the Committee seeks to reduce theological barriers often separating sexual minorities from the sources of their beliefs.”

“The normalization of polyamory rolls down the track, just as I and others predicted it would. It was, as I said, less a “slippery slope” than a simple unfolding of the logic of social liberalism,” tweeted professor Robert George.

The normalization of polyamory has become a topical subject in recent years with the advancement of same-sex marriage and gender fluidity. In 2019, the American Psychological Association even launched a task force designed to remove the “stigma” associated with it, even going so far to give the lifestyle its own politically correct term – “consensual non-monogamy.”

“Finding love and/or sexual intimacy is a central part of most people’s life experience,” the APA website says. However, the ability to engage in desired intimacy without social and medical stigmatization is not a liberty for all,” the Task Force says. “This task force seeks to address the needs of people who practice consensual non-monogamy, including their intersecting marginalized identities.”

Shortly down the list of task forces in Division 44 is the Religion and Spirituality Task Force, which promises to remove any religious objections people might have to any of the sexual lifestyles listed.

“The Task Force on Religion and Spirituality was created to encourage a confluence between sexual minority orientations and identities and religious experiences,” the page says. “It further attempts to create affirmation and acceptance for LGBT individuals of faith within theologically diverse ideological traditions. Given the importance of faith and even religious tradition in the lives of many LGBT individuals, the Committee seeks to reduce theological barriers often separating sexual minorities from the sources of their beliefs.”

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